musik-ist—leben:

il-tenore-regina:

vivelareine:

—Marie Antoinette (2006)

 Just so everyone is clear, the handsome Black man tutoring Marie Antoinette is Joseph Boulogne, classical musician extraordinaire whose work influenced Mozart’s. This has been your Western music history tidbit of the day. Adieu! 

//Also known as Chevalier de Saint-Georges. It is confirmed that they did meet each other, they lived under the same roof for a little while in Paris.

Saint-Georges was well known as a soloist. The Violin Concerto in A major, Op. 5, No. 2 is an example of such a work used to display this ability as a performer.

Saint-Georges also commissioned and conducted Haydn’s Paris Symphonies, so we have him to thank for that. However, he was not a crucial figure in Mozart’s life since Mozart did not make his mark in Paris successfully.

I do not think it is correct to say that Saint-Georges was a major influence on Mozart. Mozart had to compose for Parisian taste, as did Saint-Georges, in order to make a living there. An example of the Parisian taste is evident in Mozart’s concerto for flute and harp, K. 299. It does not show the colour and emotion we so often hear in his later works.

This is not discrediting Saint-Georges. I only wish for people to see him as a great composer in his own right rather than associating him with more well-known composers.

[Source]

Chevalier de Saint George Marie Antoniette Mozart France Classical Music History Thanks God!!! ♥♥♥ Thanks Holy Mother!!! ♥♥♥ Thanks Our Jesus!!! ♥♥♥

solointhesand:

This song is actually about an impromptu threesome: y/n

CONSTANZE: Dear little husband, where’s the ribbon?

MOZART: Inside, in the room, it’s glistening and glittering.

CONSTANZE: Put the light on for me.

MOZART: Yes, yes, I am here already.

And I am there already.

JACQUIN: Why, what the devil are you looking for?

A piece of bread? Or a cake?

MOZART: Have you got it already?

CONSTANZE: Yes, I’ve got it up to here with this shit!

MOZART: Now, now, now, now, now, now, now, now.

JACQUIN: That is going too far!

Dear people, may I venture to ask what you are looking for?

CONSTANZE/MOZART: Try it, Try it!

JACQUIN: Why, for shame!

I’m such a good-natured fellow, you could twist me round your little finger!

CONSTANZE/MOZART: Now go!

JACQUIN: Oh, no!

Look, I’ll wager I can help you, for I’m a native Viennese.

Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha!

MOZART/CONSTANZE: Our countryman?

No, there’s no need to hide anything from him.

But we’ll tell it all clearly to him.

Just be patient!

JACQUIN: Yes, that’s what I think.

Now, let’s hear then, now, let’s hear!

Damn it, let’s hear, then, or you can both go to the devil!

MOZART/CONSTANZE: Good Lapas, we are looking for the pretty ribbon.

JACQUIN: The ribbon?

Hm! Well, there it is in my hand.

CONSTANZE/MOZART: My dear boy, out of gratitude I shall always be attached to you.

JACQUIN: Say nothing! I haven’t the time.

It is too late already. 

I have a long way to go.

CONSTANZE/MOZART/JACQUIN: What joy, noble sun,

to live in the bosom of friendship.

And we also have the pretty ribbon.

Yes, we have it, we have it, yes!  

(via musik-ist--leben)

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Das Badel W.A. Mozart Constanze Mozart Jaquin Terzetto Composition Thanks God!!! ♡♡♡ Thanks Holy Mother!!!♥♥♥ Thanks Our Jesus!!! ♥♥♥

di-biancoenero:


Se gli uomini si conducessero sempre al fianco la morte non servirebbero si’ vilmente. (da Le Ultime Lettere di Jacopo Ortis)

Armoniosi accenti Dal tuo labbro volavano, E dagli occhi ridenti Traluceáno di Venere I disdegni e le paci, La speme, il pianto, e i baci. (da Ode a Luigia Pallavicini caduta da cavallo)
Si può bensì anche in mezzo alle ingiustizie sentirsi giusto, forte e libero; e la dignità dell’uomo si vendica più nel sopportare nobilmente,  che nel lamentarsi e gridare invano. (da Opere edite e postume. Epistolario)
Né più mai toccherò le sacre sponde/ ove il mio corpo fanciulletto giacque,
Zacinto mia, che te specchi nell’onde/ del greco mar da cui vergine nacque Venere ( da A Zacinto)


L’inimitabile Ugo Ughino Ughetto Ugaccio , boccol d’oro e basettone, fu Niccolò Ugo Foscolo
Zante, 6 Febbraio 1778- Turnham Green, 10 Settembre 1827
elibron

di-biancoenero:

Se gli uomini si conducessero sempre al fianco la morte non servirebbero si’ vilmente. (da Le Ultime Lettere di Jacopo Ortis)

Armoniosi accenti 
Dal tuo labbro volavano, 
E dagli occhi ridenti 
Traluceáno di Venere 
I disdegni e le paci, 
La speme, il pianto, e i baci. (da Ode a Luigia Pallavicini caduta da cavallo)

Si può bensì anche in mezzo alle ingiustizie sentirsi giusto, forte e libero; e la dignità dell’uomo si vendica più nel sopportare nobilmente,  che nel lamentarsi e gridare invano. (da Opere edite e postume. Epistolario)

Né più mai toccherò le sacre sponde/ ove il mio corpo fanciulletto giacque,

Zacinto mia, che te specchi nell’onde/ del greco mar da cui vergine nacque Venere ( da A Zacinto)

L’inimitabile Ugo Ughino Ughetto Ugaccio , boccol d’oro e basettone, fu Niccolò Ugo Foscolo

Zante, 6 Febbraio 1778- Turnham Green, 10 Settembre 1827

elibron

Ugo Foscolo Letteratura Italiana Luigia Pallavicini A Zacinto Jacopo Ortis Thanks God!!! <3 <3 <3 Thanks Our Jesus!!! <3 <3 <3 Thanks Holy Mother!!! <3 <3 <3 Love You

"Dear T.E.
I meant to write you a readable letter, but am slack. So is my forthcoming volume of stories, yet it will be dedicated, I have decided ‘To T.E., in the absence of anything else’ The dedication can be given a wrong meaning, which you will enjoy doing, and I shall like to think of you doing it. The matter is decided therefore. One of the stories is a feeble timid premonition of the one which is with you now and which is yours really, and that is what the dedication really means. If you ever inscribe anything to me, either good bad or indifferent, I shall be a lot annoyed. (This too can be given a wrong meaning. Care to have a try?)

Yours EMF"
-

Letter from E.M. Forster to T.E. Lawrence

The dedication appeared in The Eternal Moment and Other Stories

(via ouphrontis)

T.E. Lawrence Lawrence of Arabia Peter O'Toole Thomas Edward Lawrence Desert David Lean Thanks God!!! <3 <3 <3 Thanks Holy Mother!!! <3 <3 <3 Thanks Our Jesus!!! <3 <3 <3

nprfreshair:

Colonel T.E. Lawrence, oil on canvas, by Augustus John OM, 1919. 
Author  Scott Anderson (Lawrence In Arabia)  explains why T.E. Lawrence was “such a brilliant military strategist”&#160;:

[B]efore he went into archaeology, his field of intense interest was medieval history and specifically medieval military history. And what’s fascinating is the way war was being waged at the beginning of the 20th century in Arabia … was very similar to the way war was in 14th century Europe. It was war on its most primal level where where you went, who you attacked and when was determined by where there was water, where there was forage for your animals, and even how you recruited armies. Because you didn’t have a national army, so recruiting a rebel force of Arab tribesmen in Arabia meant going to the different sheiks and often forging a rapprochement between two rival sheiks … that was very much the way armies were formed in medieval Europe, so I think Lawrence had an innate understanding of how to wage war in the Middle East that a regular military officer of the time who had studied Napoleonic wars or even trench warfare, it would’ve been utterly alien to them.


via Tate Museum Collection

nprfreshair:

Colonel T.E. Lawrence, oil on canvas, by Augustus John OM, 1919.

Author  Scott Anderson (Lawrence In Arabia)  explains why T.E. Lawrence was “such a brilliant military strategist” :

[B]efore he went into archaeology, his field of intense interest was medieval history and specifically medieval military history. And what’s fascinating is the way war was being waged at the beginning of the 20th century in Arabia … was very similar to the way war was in 14th century Europe. It was war on its most primal level where where you went, who you attacked and when was determined by where there was water, where there was forage for your animals, and even how you recruited armies. Because you didn’t have a national army, so recruiting a rebel force of Arab tribesmen in Arabia meant going to the different sheiks and often forging a rapprochement between two rival sheiks … that was very much the way armies were formed in medieval Europe, so I think Lawrence had an innate understanding of how to wage war in the Middle East that a regular military officer of the time who had studied Napoleonic wars or even trench warfare, it would’ve been utterly alien to them.

via Tate Museum Collection

T.E. Lawrence Thomas Edward Lawrence Lawrence of Arabia Thanks God!!! &lt;3 &lt;3 &lt;3 Thanks Our Jesus!!! &lt;3 &lt;3 &lt;3 Thanks Holy Mother!!! &lt;3 &lt;3 &lt;3